Windows server Task scheduler Monitoring event id 111

The history of a task is tracked by events. These events can be viewed in Task Scheduler for each task to track when the task was registered, run, and when it completed or failed. The progress of a task can be monitored through its history. A task can be controlled by running or stopping the task manually (on-demand).

Event Details

Product:  Windows Operating System
ID:  111
Source:  Microsoft-Windows-TaskScheduler
Version:  6.1
Symbolic Name:  JOB_TERMINATION
Message:  Task Scheduler terminated the “%2” instance of the “%1” task due to exceeding the time allocated for execution, as configured in the task definition. Increase the configured task timeout or investigate external reasons for the delay.

Resolve

Fix task configuration settings

The task was stopped due to a configured setting. Possible causes include:
•The task ran for longer than the maximum configured run time.
•The task was configured to stop when the computer switched to battery power.
•The task was configured to stop when the computer is no longer idle.
•The task was configured to stop when a new instance of the task is triggered.

This behavior might be as expected. However, if the behavior was unexpected you can reconfigure the task configuration settings.

To update the task settings and conditions:

  1. Click the Start button and type Task Scheduler in the Start Search box.
  2. Select the Task Scheduler program to start Task Scheduler.
  3. Select the task to configure by locating the task in the task folder hierarchy. Right-click the task, and select Properties.
  4. On the Settings and Conditions tabs, update the task settings and conditions.
  5. Click OK.

Verify

To verify that the execution of a task has completed as expected:

  1. Click the Start button and type Task Scheduler in the Start Search box.
  2. Select the Task Scheduler program to start Task Scheduler.
  3. Select the task to run by locating the task in the task folder hierarchy.
  4. On the Actions menu click Run. You can also click Run in the Actions pane.
  5. Click the History tab for the task to verify that it contains events indicating the task was registered successfully. Also, ensure that the task completed successfully or that the task timed out as expected.
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Windows server Task scheduler Monitoring event id 102

The history of a task is tracked by events. These events can be viewed in Task Scheduler for each task to track when the task was registered, run, and when it completed or failed. The progress of a task can be monitored through its history. A task can be controlled by running or stopping the task manually (on-demand).

Event Details :

Product:               Windows Operating System
ID:                           102
Source:                  Microsoft-Windows-TaskScheduler
Version:                 6.1
Symbolic Name:  JOB_SUCCESS
Message:               Task Scheduler successfully finished the “%3” instance of the “%1” task for user “%2”.

Resolve :

This is a normal condition. No further action is required.

Slow SharePoint improve performance without upgrading hardware

what you can do if your SharePoint is sometimes very slow.

E.g.: on the first start of a Site
Sometimes during the day a search query will take about a minute until you get results…..

Just look on that article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2625048

it will improve “feeled” performance (site response times) massive, if you’re going to implement both solutions.

Disabling CRL Check is just necessary if the SP Server does not have internet connectivity, that means proxy settings must be configured for the server itself

http://technet.microsoft.com/de-de/library/bb430772(v=exchg.141).aspx, and your proxy must allow traffic from the server of course.

search diagnostics and reports sharepoint

We can access and analyze several query and crawl health reports, logs and usage reports from the Search service application in the SharePoint Central Administration to monitor the health of the search system.

The health reports and logs only contain information after a full crawl has completed. To run a full crawl, we have to set up a Search service application, add at least one content source, and then start a full crawl.

To view the health reports and the crawl log, one have to be an administrator of the Search service application. Alternatively, an administrator who is a member of the Farm Administrators group can grant user accounts Read permissions on the Search service application. A user account that has Read permissions can only view the Search service application status page, the health reports and the crawl log.

Query health reports:

  1. Trend
  2. Overall
  3. Main Flow
  4. Federation
  5. SharePoint Search Provider
  6. People Search Provider
  7. Index Engine

To view query health reports:

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of or has Read permissions to the Search service application.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Query Health Reports.
  5. On the Search Service Application: Query Latency Trend page, click the query report that you want to view.

The following table shows which reports are available.

query-health-report

Crawl health reports:

SharePoint 2013 provides the following reports about crawl health:

  1. Crawl Rate
  2. Crawl Latency
  3. Crawl Queue
  4. Crawl Freshness
  5. Content Processing Activity
  6. CPU and Memory Load
  7. Continuous Crawl

To view crawl health reports

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of or has Read permissions to the Search service application.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Crawl Health Reports.
  5. On the Search Service Application: Crawl Reports page, click the crawl health report that you want to view.

The following table shows which reports are available.

crawl-health-report

Crawl log:

The crawl log tracks information about the status of crawled content. This log lets you determine whether crawled content was successfully added to the index, whether it was excluded because of a crawl rule, or whether indexing failed because of an error. The crawl log also contains information such as the time of the last successful crawl and whether any crawl rules were applied. You can use the crawl log to diagnose problems with the search experience.

To view the crawl log

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of the Search service application, or has Read permissions to it.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Crawl Log.
  5. On the Crawl Log – Content Source page, click the view that you want.

crawl-log-views

Additional columns in the Content Source, Host Name and Crawl History views:

content-source-host-name-crawl-history-view

Usage reports (search report):

To view usage reports

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of or has Read permissions to the Search service application.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Usage Reports.
  5. On the View Usage Reports page, click the usage or search reports view that you want view.

usage-report-search-report

 

Configure diagnostic logging SharePoint 2016

The SharePoint Server 2016 environment might require configuration of the diagnostic logging settings after initial deployment, after upgrade, and if a change is made to the environment, such as adding or removing a server.

The guidelines in the following list can help you form best practices for the specific environment.

* Change the drive to which the server writes logs:

By default, SharePoint Server 2016 writes diagnostic logs to the same drive and partition on which it was installed. Because diagnostic logging can use a large amount of drive space and compromise drive performance, you should configure SharePoint Server 2016 to write to another drive on which SharePoint Server 2016 is not installed.

You should also consider the connection speed to the drive on which SharePoint Server 2016 writes the logs. If verbose-level logging is configured, the server records a large amount of data. Therefore, a slow connection might result in poor log performance.

* Restrict log disk space usage:

By default, the amount of disk space that diagnostic logging can use is unlimited. Therefore, restrict the disk space that logging uses, especially if you configure logging to write verbose-level events. When the disk reaches the restriction, SharePoint Server 2016 removes the oldest logs before it records new logging data.

* Use the Verbose setting sparingly:

You can configure diagnostic logging to record verbose-level events. This means that SharePoint Server 2016 records every action that it takes. Verbose-level logging can quickly use drive space and affect drive and server performance. You can use verbose-level logging to record more detail when you are making critical changes and then reconfigure logging to record only higher-level events after you make the change.

* Regularly back up logs:

Diagnostic logs contain important data. Therefore, back up the logs regularly to ensure that this data is preserved. When you restrict log drive space usage, or if you keep logs for only a few days, SharePoint Server 2016 automatically deletes log files, starting with the oldest files first, when the threshold is met.

* Enable event log flooding protection:

When you enable this setting, SharePoint Server 2016 detects repeating events in the Windows event log, and suppresses them until conditions return to a typical state.

You can set the level of diagnostic logging for the event log and for the trace log. This limits the types and amount of information that are written to each log.

The following tables define the levels of logging that are available for the event log and trace log.

event-log-levels

trace-log-levels

Configure diagnostic logging by using Central Administration :

  1. In Central Administration, on the home page, click Monitoring.
  2. On the Monitoring page, in the Reporting section, click Configure diagnostic logging.
  3. On the Diagnostic Logging page, in the Event Throttling section, configure event throttling as follows:To configure event throttling for all categories:
    1. Select the All Categories check box.
    2. Select the event log level from the Least critical event to report to the event log list.
    3. Select the trace log level from the Least critical event to report to the trace log list.

    To configure event throttling for one or more categories:

    1. Select the check boxes of the categories that you want.
    2. Select the event log level from the Least critical event to report to the event log list.
    3. Select the trace log level from the Least critical event to report to the trace log list.

    To configure event throttling for one or more subcategories (you can expand one or more categories and select any subcategory):

    1. Click the plus (+) next to the category to expand the category.
    2. Select the check box of the subcategory.
    3. Select the event log level from the Least critical event to report to the event log list.
    4. Select the trace log level from the Least critical event to report to the trace log list.

    To return event throttling for all categories to default settings:

    1. Select the All Categories check box.
    2. Select Reset to default from the Least critical event to report to the event log list.
    3. Select Reset to default from the Least critical event to report to the trace log list.
  4. In the Event Log Flood Protection section, select the Enable Event Log Flood Protection check box.
  5. In the Trace Log section, in the Path box, type the path of the folder to which you want logs to be written.
  6. In the Number of days to store log files box, type the number of days (1-366) that you want logs to be kept. After this time, logs will automatically be deleted.
  7. To restrict the disk space that logs can use, select the Restrict Trace Log disk space usage check box, and then type the number gigabytes (GB) you want to restrict log files to. When logs reach this value, older logs will automatically be deleted.
  8. After you have made the changes that you want on the Diagnostic Logging page, click OK.

Configure diagnostic logging by using Windows PowerShell :

  1. Verify that you have the following memberships:
  • securityadmin fixed server role on the SQL Server instance.
  • db_owner fixed database role on all databases that are to be updated.
  • Administrators group on the server on which you are running the Windows PowerShell cmdlets.

An administrator can use the Add-SPShellAdmin cmdlet to grant permissions to use SharePoint Server 2016 cmdlets.

  1. On the Start menu, click All Programs.
  2. Click SharePoint 2016.
  3. Click SharePoint 2016 Management Shell.
  4. To change the drive to which the server writes logs, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, type the following command:

Set-SPDiagnosticConfig -LogLocation D:\DiagnosticLogs

  1. To restrict log disk space usage, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, type the following command:

Set-SPDiagnosticConfig -LogMaxDiskSpaceUsageEnabled

Or assign the maximum disk space for logs:

Set-SPDiagnosticConfig -LogDiskSpaceUsageGB 500

  1. To view the current logging level, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, type the following command:

Get-SPLogLevel

  1. To change the logging level, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, type the following command:

Set-SPLogLevel -TraceSeverity Monitorable

To set all categories back to default levels, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, type the following command, and then press ENTER:

Clear-SPLogLevel

9. To enable event log flooding protection, at the Windows PowerShell command prompt, type the following command:

Set-SPDiagnosticConfig -EventLogFloodProtectionEnabled