Category Archives: sharepoint2010

parse error processing item failed sharepoint

parse error processing this item failed because of an unknown error when trying to parse its contents

There is parse error found in the Crawl log of a SharePoint 2013 environment. Processing this item failed because of an unknown error when trying to parsing its contents. (Error parsing document,Sandbox worker pool is closed,SearchID)

  1. In order to fix this you can try to perform the following action plan:
  2. Open "Local Policies
  3. Click on “User rights assignment
    adjust memory quotes-1276x416

    adjust memory quotes

  4. Make sure that the search service account has the following rights:"Replace a process level token”.
    replace process level token-1060x766

    replace process level token

  5. "Adjust memory quotas for a process"
    adjust memory quota-1054x762

    adjust memory quota

  6. "Impersonate a client after authentication"
    impersonate client-1052x758

    impersonate client

  7. Please make sure that the policies don't get changed afterwards.
  8. Run a clear configuration cache
  9. Start a full crawl and the errors should be gone.
Advertisements

Slow SharePoint improve performance without upgrading hardware

what you can do if your SharePoint is sometimes very slow.

E.g.: on the first start of a Site
Sometimes during the day a search query will take about a minute until you get results.....

Just look on that article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2625048

it will improve "feeled" performance (site response times) massive, if you're going to implement both solutions.

Disabling CRL Check is just necessary if the SP Server does not have internet connectivity, that means proxy settings must be configured for the server itself

http://technet.microsoft.com/de-de/library/bb430772(v=exchg.141).aspx, and your proxy must allow traffic from the server of course.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Crawling tool

Crawling error when attempting to download item

Crawling error when attempting to download item

There is error in crawling in the SharePoint environment and the error message is \"The SharePoint item being crawled returned an error when attempting to download the item for example .aspx files\"

Crawling Error:

SharePoint Crawl Log Error: The SharePoint item being crawled returned an error when attempting to download the item for example .aspx files

Solution:

  1. Open Regedit on your search server.
  2. Navigate to this registry key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftOffice Server14.0SearchGlobalGathering Manager
  3. Change Value “UserAgent” from “MSIE 4.01” to “MSIE 8.0”.
  4. Restart the SharePoint Search Service.
  5. Open a SharePoint PowerShell.
  6. Get-SPSessionStateService.
  7. If this returns false then we need to deploy one
    Enable-SPSessionStateService -DatabaseName “NameOfDatabase”
Advertisements
Advertisements
Crawling tool

Networking Utilities tools helpful for sharepoint

Active Directory Explorer:

Active Directory Explorer (AD Explorer) is an advanced Active Directory (AD) viewer and editor. We can use AD Explorer to easily navigate an AD database, define favorite locations, view object properties and attributes without having to open dialog boxes, edit permissions, view an object’s schema, and execute sophisticated searches that you can save and re-execute.

AD Explorer also includes the ability to save snapshots of an AD database for off-line viewing and comparisons. When we load a saved snapshot, we can navigate and explore it as we would a live database. If we have two snapshots of an AD database we can use AD Explorer’s comparison functionality to see what objects, attributes and security permissions changed between them.

active-directory-explorer
download

Insight for Active Directory:

ADInsight is an LDAP (Light-weight Directory Access Protocol) real-time monitoring tool aimed at troubleshooting Active Directory client applications. Use its detailed tracing of Active Directory client-server communications to solve Windows authentication, Exchange, DNS, and other problems.

ADInsight uses DLL injection techniques to intercept calls that applications make in the Wldap32.dll library, which is the standard library underlying Active Directory APIs such ldap and ADSI.

Unlike network monitoring tools, ADInsight intercepts and interprets all client-side APIs, including those that do not result in transmission to a server.

ADInsight monitors any process into which it can load it’s tracing DLL, which means that it does not require administrative permissions, however, if run with administrative rights, it will also monitor system processes, including windows services.

insight-for-active-directory

download
AdRestore v1.1:

Windows Server 2003 introduces the ability to restore deleted (“tombstoned”) objects. This simple command-line utility enumerates the deleted objects in a domain and gives you the option of restoring each one. Source code is based on sample code in the Microsoft Platform SDK. This MS KB article describes the use of AdRestore:

840001: How to restore deleted user accounts and their group memberships in Active Directory

adrestore

download

PipeList v1.02:

Did you know that the device driver that implements named pipes is actually a file system driver” In fact, the driver’s name is NPFS.SYS, for “Named Pipe File System”. What you might also find surprising is that its possible to obtain a directory listing of the named pipes defined on a system. This fact is not documented, nor is it possible to do this using the Win32 API. Directly using NtQueryDirectoryFile, the native function that the Win32 FindFile APIs rely on, makes it possible to list the pipes. The directory listing NPFS returns also indicates the maximum number of pipe instances set for each pipe and the number of active instances.

downloadPsFile v1.02:

Introduction

The “net file” command shows you a list of the files that other computers have opened on the system upon which you execute the command, however it truncates long path names and doesn’t let you see that information for remote systems.

PsFile is a command-line utility that shows a list of files on a system that are opened remotely, and it also allows you to close opened files either by name or by a file identifier.

Installation

Just copy PsFile onto your executable path, and type “psfile”.

Using PsFile

The default behavior of PsFile is to list the files on the local system that are open by remote systems. Typing a command followed by “- ” displays information on the syntax for the

command.

Usage: psfile [\RemoteComputer [-u Username [-p Password]]] [[Id | path] [-c]]

-u Specifies optional user name for login to remote computer.
-p Specifies password for user name. If this is omitted, you will be prompted to enter the password without it being echoed to the screen.
Id Identifier (as assigned by PsFile) of the file for which to display information or to close.
Path Full or partial path of files to match for information display or close.
-c Closes the files identifed by ID or path.

How it Works

PsFile uses the NET API, which is documented in the Platform SDK.download

PsPing v2.01:

Introduction

PsPing implements Ping functionality, TCP ping, latency and bandwidth measurement. Use the following command-line options to show the usage for each test type:

Installation
Copy PsPing onto your executable path. Typing “psping” displays its usage syntax.

Using PsPing
PsPing implements Ping functionality, TCP ping, latency and bandwidth measurement. Use the following command-line options to show the usage for each test type:

Usage: psping -? [i|t|l|b]

-? I Usage for ICMP ping.
-? T Usage for TCP ping.
-? L Usage for latency test.
-? B Usage for bandwidth test.

ICMP ping usage: psping [[-6]|[-4]] [-h [buckets | ,,…]] [-i ] [-l [k|m] [-q] [-t|-n ] [-w ]

-h Print histogram (default bucket count is 20).
If you specify a single argument, it’s interpreted as a bucket count and the histogram will contain that number of buckets covering the entire time range of values. Specify a comma-separated list of times to create a custom histogram (e.g. “0.01,0.05,1,5,10”).
-i Interval in seconds. Specify 0 for fast ping.
-l Request size. Append ‘k’ for kilobytes and ‘m’ for megabytes.
-n Number of pings or append ‘s’ to specify seconds e.g. ’10s’.
-q Don’t output during pings.
-t Ping until stopped with Ctrl+C and type Ctrl+Break for statistics.
-w Warmup with the specified number of iterations (default is 1).
-4 Force using IPv4.
-6 Force using IPv6.
For high-speed ping tests use -q and -i 0.

TCP ping usage: psping [[-6]|[-4]] [-h [buckets | ,,…]] [-i ] [-l [k|m] [-q] [-t|-n ] [-w ]

-h Print histogram (default bucket count is 20).
If you specify a single argument, it’s interpreted as a bucket count and the histogram will contain that number of buckets covering the entire time range of values. Specify a comma-separated list of times to create a custom histogram (e.g. “0.01,0.05,1,5,10”).
-i Interval in seconds. Specify 0 for fast ping.
-l Request size. Append ‘k’ for kilobytes and ‘m’ for megabytes.
-n Number of pings or append ‘s’ to specify seconds e.g. ’10s’.
-q Don’t output during pings.
-t Ping until stopped with Ctrl+C and type Ctrl+Break for statistics.
-w Warmup with the specified number of iterations (default is 1).
-4 Force using IPv4.
-6 Force using IPv6.
For high-speed ping tests use -q and -i 0.

TCP and UDP latency usage:

server: psping [[-6]|[-4]] [-f]
client: psping [[-6]|[-4]] [-f] [-u] [-h [buckets | ,,…]] [-r] [k|m]] [-w ]

-f Open source firewall port during the run.
-u UDP (default is TCP).
-h Print histogram (default bucket count is 20).
If you specify a single argument, it’s interpreted as a bucket count and the histogram will contain that number of buckets covering the entire time range of values. Specify a comma-separated list of times to create a custom histogram (e.g. “0.01,0.05,1,5,10”).
-l Request size. Append ‘k’ for kilobytes and ‘m’ for megabytes.
-n Number of sends/receives. Append ‘s’ to specify seconds e.g. ’10s’
-r Receive from the server instead of sending.
-w Warmup with the specified number of iterations (default is 5).
-4 Force using IPv4.
-6 Force using IPv6.
-s Server listening address and port.

The server can serve both latency and bandwidth tests and remains active until you terminate it with Control-C.

TCP and UDP bandwidth usage:

server: psping [[-6]|[-4]] [-f]
client: psping [[-6]|[-4]] [-f] [-u] [-h [buckets | ,,…]] [-r] [k|m]] [-i ] [-w ]

-f Open source firewall port during the run.
-u UDP (default is TCP).
-b Bandwidth test.
-h Print histogram (default bucket count is 20).
If you specify a single argument, it’s interpreted as a bucket count and the histogram will contain that number of buckets covering the entire time range of values. Specify a comma-separated list of times to create a custom histogram (e.g. “0.01,0.05,1,5,10”).
-i Number of outstanding I/Os (default is min of 16 and 2x CPU cores).
-l Request size. Append ‘k’ for kilobytes and ‘m’ for megabytes.
-n Number of sends/receives. Append ‘s’ to specify seconds e.g. ’10s’
-r Receive from the server instead of sending.
-w Warmup for the specified iterations (default is 2x CPU cores).
-4 Force using IPv4.
-6 Force using IPv6.
-s Server listening address and port.

The server can serve both latency and bandwidth tests and remains active until you terminate it with Control-C.

Examples
This command executes an ICMP ping test for 10 iterations with 3 warmup iterations:

psping -n 10 -w 3 marklap

To execute a TCP connect test, specify the port number. The following command executes connect attempts against the target as quickly as possible, only printing a summary when finished with the 100 iterations and 1 warmup iteration:

psping -n 100 -i 0 -q marklap:80

To configure a server for latency and bandwidth tests, simply specify the -s option and the source address and port the server will bind to:

psping -s 192.168.2.2:5000

A buffer size is required to perform a TCP latency test. This example measures the round trip latency of sending an 8KB packet to the target server, printing a histogram with 100 buckets when completed:

psping -l 8k -n 10000 -h 100 192.168.2.2:5000

This command tests bandwidth to a PsPing server listening at the target IP address for 10 seconds and produces a histogram with 100 buckets. Note that the test must run for at least one second after warmup for a histogram to generate. Simply add -u to have PsPing perform a UDP bandwidth test.

psping -b -l 8k -n 10000 -h 100 192.168.2.2:5000

download

PsTools:

Introduction

The Windows NT and Windows 2000 Resource Kits come with a number of command-line tools that help you administer your Windows NT/2K systems. Over time.

The first tool in the suite was PsList, a tool that lets you view detailed information about processes, and the suite is continually growing.

The “Ps” prefix in PsList relates to the fact that the standard UNIX process listing command-line tool is named “ps”, so adopted this prefix for all the tools in order to tie them together into a suite of tools named PsTools.

Note: some anti-virus scanners report that one or more of the tools are infected with a “remote admin” virus. None of the PsTools contain viruses, but they have been used by viruses, which is why they trigger virus notifications.

The tools included in the PsTools suite, which are downloadable as a package, are:

PsExec – execute processes remotely
PsFile – shows files opened remotely
PsGetSid – display the SID of a computer or a user
PsInfo – list information about a system
PsPing – measure network performance
PsKill – kill processes by name or process ID
PsList – list detailed information about processes
PsLoggedOn – see who’s logged on locally and via resource sharing (full source is included)
PsLogList – dump event log records
PsPasswd – changes account passwords
PsService – view and control services
PsShutdown – shuts down and optionally reboots a computer
PsSuspend – suspends processes
PsUptime – shows you how long a system has been running since its last reboot (PsUptime’s functionality has been incorporated into PsInfo)
The PsTools download package includes an HTML help file with complete usage information for all the tools.

download

ShareEnum v1.6

Introduction

An aspect of Windows NT/2000/XP network security that’s often overlooked is file shares. A common security flaw occurs when users define file shares with lax security, allowing unauthorized users to see sensitive files.

There are no built-in tools to list shares viewable on a network and their security settings, but ShareEnum fills the void and allows you to lock down file shares in your network.

When you run ShareEnum it uses NetBIOS enumeration to scan all the computers within the domains accessible to it, showing file and print shares and their security settings. Because only a domain administrator has the ability to view all network resources, ShareEnum is most effective when you run it from a domain administrator account.

shareenum

How It Works

ShareEnum uses WNetEnumResource to enumerate domains and the computers within. them and NetShareEnum to enumerate shares on computers.

download

TCPView v3.05

Introduction

TCPView is a Windows program that will show you detailed listings of all TCP and UDP endpoints on your system, including the local and remote addresses and state of TCP connections. On Windows Server 2008, Vista, and XP, TCPView also reports the name of the process that owns the endpoint.

TCPView provides a more informative and conveniently presented subset of the Netstat program that ships with Windows. The TCPView download includes Tcpvcon, a command-line version with the same functionality.

tcpview

Using TCPView

When you start TCPView it will enumerate all active TCP and UDP endpoints, resolving all IP addresses to their domain name versions. You can use a toolbar button or menu item to toggle the display of resolved names. On Windows XP systems, TCPView shows the name of the process that owns each endpoint.

By default, TCPView updates every second, but you can use the Options|Refresh Rate menu item to change the rate. Endpoints that change state from one update to the next are highlighted in yellow; those that are deleted are shown in red, and new endpoints are shown in green.

You can close established TCP/IP connections (those labeled with a state of ESTABLISHED) by selecting File|Close Connections, or by right-clicking on a connection and choosing Close Connections from the resulting context menu.
You can save TCPView’s output window to a file using the Save menu item.

Using Tcpvcon

Tcpvcon usage is similar to that of the built-in Windows netstat utility:
Usage: tcpvcon [-a] [-c] [-n] [process name or PID]

-a Show all endpoints (default is to show established TCP connections).
-c Print output as CSV.
-n Don’t resolve addresses..

Microsoft TCPView KB Article

This Microsoft KB article references TCPView:
816944: “Unexpected Error 0x8ffe2740 Occurred” Error Message When You Try to Start a Web Site

download

Whois v1.14

Introduction

Whois performs the registration record for the domain name or IP address that you specify.

Usage

Usage: whois [-v] domainname [whois.server]

-v Print whois information for referrals
Domainname can be either a DNS name (e.g. www.sysinternals.com) or IP address (e.g. 66.193.254.46).

download

search diagnostics and reports sharepoint

We can access and analyze several query and crawl health reports, logs and usage reports from the Search service application in the SharePoint Central Administration to monitor the health of the search system.

The health reports and logs only contain information after a full crawl has completed. To run a full crawl, we have to set up a Search service application, add at least one content source, and then start a full crawl.

To view the health reports and the crawl log, one have to be an administrator of the Search service application. Alternatively, an administrator who is a member of the Farm Administrators group can grant user accounts Read permissions on the Search service application. A user account that has Read permissions can only view the Search service application status page, the health reports and the crawl log.

Query health reports:

  1. Trend
  2. Overall
  3. Main Flow
  4. Federation
  5. SharePoint Search Provider
  6. People Search Provider
  7. Index Engine

To view query health reports:

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of or has Read permissions to the Search service application.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Query Health Reports.
  5. On the Search Service Application: Query Latency Trend page, click the query report that you want to view.

The following table shows which reports are available.

query-health-report

Crawl health reports:

SharePoint 2013 provides the following reports about crawl health:

  1. Crawl Rate
  2. Crawl Latency
  3. Crawl Queue
  4. Crawl Freshness
  5. Content Processing Activity
  6. CPU and Memory Load
  7. Continuous Crawl

To view crawl health reports

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of or has Read permissions to the Search service application.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Crawl Health Reports.
  5. On the Search Service Application: Crawl Reports page, click the crawl health report that you want to view.

The following table shows which reports are available.

crawl-health-report

Crawl log:

The crawl log tracks information about the status of crawled content. This log lets you determine whether crawled content was successfully added to the index, whether it was excluded because of a crawl rule, or whether indexing failed because of an error. The crawl log also contains information such as the time of the last successful crawl and whether any crawl rules were applied. You can use the crawl log to diagnose problems with the search experience.

To view the crawl log

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of the Search service application, or has Read permissions to it.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Crawl Log.
  5. On the Crawl Log – Content Source page, click the view that you want.

crawl-log-views

Additional columns in the Content Source, Host Name and Crawl History views:

content-source-host-name-crawl-history-view

Usage reports (search report):

To view usage reports

  1. Verify that the user account that is performing this procedure is an administrator of or has Read permissions to the Search service application.
  2. In Central Administration, under Application Management, click Manage service applications.
  3. On the Service Applications page, click the Search service application.
  4. On the Search Administration page, in the Quick Launch, in the Diagnostics section, click Usage Reports.
  5. On the View Usage Reports page, click the usage or search reports view that you want view.

usage-report-search-report

 

SharePoint 2010 Cannot add the specified assembly to the GAC

Error:

“Cannot add the specified assembly to the GAC in SharePoint 2010”

We had a solution deployed numerous times as it houses a line of business process in SharePoint 2010. On performing Upgrade Solution via stsadm or Update-Solution via Power Shell , encountered the error: cannot add the specified assembly to the GAC.

We started by created a test solution package and deployed it on the environment which worked fine to identify whether the issue was with the Package or environment.

On updating the LOB Solution , it couldn’t add the assembly to the GAC for LOB WSP, on one of the WFE servers.

Performed an IISRESET and restarted the timer service on the failing WFE, deployed the WSP package again, it did work but when we tried updating it again at the later stage, got the same error.

Solution :

I had to rely on Process Explorer to figure out what process was using the DLL and from where. The beauty of this tool is, it displays the list of processes running on the server and what DLL’s its using.

You can do a Find for the DLL file from the top menu bar to identify the process which it’s using.

I figured out using the Process Explorer, the Timer Service Process was referring to DLL from c:windowsassemblytemp

I cleared the Temp folders which had the DLL, performed an IISRESET and restarted the Timer Service

This resolved the issue for me. You will have to identify what process is conflicting and troubleshoot the same accordingly.